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SkeletonPete Says

Your Own Private Dunkirk: Lyme Disease

i have lyme, lyme disease, indie go-go, i have lyme the movie, valerie yawien

Art Director Sarah Rose Andrew’s evocative poster for “I Have Lyme, The Movie” now in the crowfunding stage of pre-production.


You Are Surrounded…
I predict that the most exciting “superhero movie” of the summer will be Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk. Though it doesn’t include any character with powers beyond our galaxy or scientifically enhanced abilities it serves as a historical reminder that when faced with seemingly insurmountable odds simple humans can and will rise to the challenge, persevere, and maybe win – even if only for trying. That’s what the “little ships” did at Dunkirk in spring of 1940. That’s all Superman fighting depression era thugs or Captain America slugging Hitler were ever meant to represent, “us” at our zenith.

So where is this going? Well, it’s not a summer movie preview, but it is my decidedly right-brained metaphor for a scenario created by actor and screenwriter Valerie Rose Yawien. It’s a real story that takes being stranded and surrounded by an enemy to a very personal level. In this case the enemy is Lyme Disease, and the stranding is a social and financial one.

All Your Base Are Belong To Us…
Lyme Disease is an insidious affliction that can go misdiagnosed for years as it continues to debilitate its host. In the process families are stressed to their limit, friendships dissipate, lovers flee, and bank accounts are emptied by uninsured medical costs. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has estimated that 300,000 citizens of the United States contract Lyme each year. It is expected that the population of ticks which transmit the Lyme bacteria to humans through their bite will be at record highs in 2017. It is not an alarmist statement to warn anyone that simply mowing the lawn or doing some backyard gardening puts you at risk. You can read the hard numbers on the CDC website, but statistics only go so far to understanding the true devastation this outbreak is causing.

Lyme to Lemonade…
Valerie, a Lyme sufferer herself, is the founder of Artists Bite Back, a creative collective for chronic illness impacted artists. She is also a Young Leaders Council member of the non-profit Global Lyme Alliance. She knows this story from the inside. As an outgrowth of her advocacy she decided to shed light on the everyday battles posed by the disease with an autobiographical screenplay. Over the last year that script called “I Have Lyme, The Movie” has been workshopped, reviewed, and refined. This week its pre-production team launched an Indie Go-Go Campaign to bring it to the screen. The premiere is currently scheduled for May (Lyme Awareness Month) 2018.

The author sees her film, as well as its production period, as a rallying point. In an exclusive statement Valerie told us, “The Lyme community is a very strong and vocal one which is just waiting for the perfect opportunity to speak out about such a misunderstood and underserved health epidemic.” “We have people reaching out to us on our various social media platforms every day, asking when/where this movie will be screened and how they can see it. People are ready for this type of project.”

(Indie) Go-Go Juiced…
The author feels crowdfunding is a “perfect fit” because “this campaign is both a grassroots effort to raise the funds to get the movie made, as well as a social justice project, with the Film serving as a vehicle for Lyme Disease awareness.” As the Indie Go-Go team statement notes, “…a major component of our Film’s mission is to hold screenings with panels addressing the themes presented in the Film – Those of young people, especially women, overcoming chronic illness, families coping with incredible challenges, ways in which artists can empower themselves through advocacy, etc.”

Lend A Hand, In Any Way You Can…
Can you help? Sure. Every little ship aids the cause. While a donation to complete the film is appreciated, being a social media superhero for the campaign can be just as valuable.

I also urge you to arm yourself, your family, and friends with information about this growing health crisis.
lyme disease, i have lyme the movie, valerie ryawien, indie go-go

Resources…

Lyme Disease Information

Centers for Disease Control

Global Lyme Alliance

“I Have Lyme, The Movie”

Indie Go-Go Campaign

Official Website

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

Dissecting Seconds: “Things I Learned from the Movies” Blogathon

things i learned from the moviesIntro…
Thanks to Kristina (Speakeasy) and Ruth (Silver Screenings) for initiating and administering the “Things I Learned from the Movies” Blog-a-thon. As in the past their “assignment” has sent me on a more introspective and autobiographical journey than I might normally attempt or share.

Please be sure to see the blogathon nightly round-ups at their websites for the wealth of interesting features this virtual gathering will surely generate. Send some comment love to the ones you really like, and consider following them.

Gimme a Second…
Stop Motion. It’s what I’ve done most of my life, from behind a camera and usually at 1/60th or 1/125th of a second. Film’s light sensitivity, as in ASA/ISO ratings, in pre-digital days offered limited choices.

Stop Motion, the animation technique, was an obsession throughout my pre to mid-teens, until the first two Led Zeppelin albums and The Who’s Live At Leeds caught my ear and I had to learn how to make that sound.

During those years I spent hours methodically clicking off one frame of film at a time through the Keystone 8mm camera my father gave me. Dad was pragmatic. It was already clear that I wasn’t going to be the fastest left handed pitcher in the history of National League Baseball, but I did share another skill set with him and that was photography and a seemingly natural understanding of visual composition.

stop motion animation, skeletonpete

My old buddy Glip, a little worse for the wear, but still mellow & inquisitive in 2016.

Most of my films centered around the adventures of a clay “everyman” I called Glip. In retrospect Glip was a Gumby analog who ran around my home, raiding the refrigerator, climbing ladders, literally swinging from the chandelier. In other films Glip took on the personas of Ebenezer Scrooge, Long John Silver and Mr. Hyde, in (purportedly) comedic spins on classic literary works.

When more majestic scenarios were required my articulated 12 inch tall G.I. Joe’s became helpless subjects and were buried under plasticine to emulate my favorite fantastic film creatures. Ray Harryhausen’s mighty Cyclops was rendered – as best possible – with green clay, a faux pearl eyeball, and a toothpick horn.

ray harryhausen, jason and the argonauts, hydra

Ray Harryhausen’s previsualization of Hydra battle from “Jason and the Argonauts.”

Thinking In Stills…
When not producing these meisterwerks an inordinate amount of time was spent staring into a consumer grade moviola screen pouring over Castle Films’ ruthlessly edited collector’s reels. Seventh Voyage of Sinbad was my favorite. I scrubbed that film back and forth intently absorbing the specific movements applied to the Dragon versus Cyclops battle, and I was particularly obsessed with the exact frame in Jason and the Argonauts where actor Todd Armstrong drops his real sword and it is replaced by Harryhausen’s miniature blade which plunges into the heart of the seven headed hydra model.

Simultaneously I was introduced to the work of photojournalist Arthur Fellig by my Father. Fellig became popularly known as WeeGee (think Ouija board) because of his ability to divine the right spot to be in and capture the action. As my Dad pointed out, the goal is not only to produce a technically efficient photograph but to capture an image that encapsulates the event if only a single photo goes to print. In fact, with WeeGee’s rig of a 4X5 Speed Graphic camera, and single flash bulb illumination, there was no room for error. It was a “bring ‘em back alive” style of street photography and a high contrast graphic look that I began to emulate.

Looking back, these were clearly the formative seeds of my fixation with “the instant.” I watch a motion picture but recall it in primary still images. I see a still image and envision the action.

Arthur "WeeGee" Fellig had a clairvoyant knack for capturing the moment.

Arthur “WeeGee” Fellig had a clairvoyant knack for capturing the moment.

Fractions of Actions…
Eventually I came to see stop motion, the animation technique, as a misnomer. Whereas a still photographer freezes a split second of action, the animator is not stopping motion at all. The subject is static, it “moves” by virtue of a fault of human visual perception. Persistence of vision. All those incremental movements rushing by our eyes can’t be processed as single images and blur into an illusion of life. It works, from the simplest flip book to the most epic mega film.

Even so, the inverse appears to apply. As “move-y” as movies get they are still ultimately built as series of frames with some being more potent or dominant than others. Those key frames appear to be what impact on our brains when we remember a scene. I applied this perception to my animation work with a method of capturing the peak of action with additional frames, thereby boosting it’s visual imprint.

I Scream, You Scream…
Thinking in stills is not a cinematic aberration. Director Sergei Eisenstein knew it. Every film 101 student has been introduced to The Battleship Potemkin (1925) and his triptych of stone lions juxtaposed to seemingly rise to the battle call. It is a hallmark of film editing for effect called montage. Director James Whale seems to have cribbed its timing in the treble of jump cuts to close-up that underscore the first entrance of the monster in Frankenstein (1931).

Eisenstein’s then experimental editing technique is most obvious in the famous Odessa Steps sequence. The scene is filled with examples of “stills in motion,” from the careening baby carriage to the shock and horror on the faces of the victims. Often emulated, I believe never equaled, the sequence also owes part of its origin to the iconic instant of horror portrayed by artist Edvard Munch’s The Scream (1893).

Munch’s painting is one of the most familiar and widely appropriated images of this and the previous century. It represents a second in time when artist perceived “the shriek of nature” as he watched a blood red sunset over the Oslo fjord in Norway. It is a single image but it is also a movie. It contains all the information required to allow us to extrapolate a story, perceive an emotion, even if we know nothing about it before our first viewing. It conveys its peak psychological power and elicits a palpable reaction that appears to be universally, and non-verbally, understood. It’s a proto-emoji.

edvard munch, the scream

Edvard Munch’s painting “The Scream” has a long history of influence.

Instinct Karma…
Impactful visuals don’t die, they get reinterpreted. Eisenstein clearly understood the psychological power of this image and utilized it to great effect in several shots during his famed sequence. Later on, influenced by the Eisenstein scene, artist Francis Bacon rendered the screaming amorphous thing that inhabits the right section of his triptych Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1950).

Munch’s distressing vision, one which he revisited in different media several times between 1893 and 1910, appears to tap into the collective human unconscious theorized by Professor Carl Jung. Art historian Robert Rosenbaum’s postulation that Munch may have found his initial inspiration in the gape mouthed pose of a Peruvian mummy exhibited at the 1889 Universal Exposition in Paris deepens the possibly of ancient archetypal connections. We only need to view the “Captain Howdy” stingers of The Exorcist series or the photo of an immolated Iraqi soldier from the first gulf war to find modern correlations.

While Eisenstein’s work presents a prime example of the frozen moment technique, other staples abound. Carl Theodor Dryer’s restriction of characters to extreme close-ups throughout The Passion of Joan of Arc reduces them to nearly static icons. There’s also Luis Bunuel’s use of freeze frames in Viridiana that transmute his beggar’s banquet tableau into an irreverent “snap shot” of Leonardo DaVinci’s The Last Supper.

la jetée, chris marker

“La Jetée” In 1962 Chris Marker told his time travel story in a series of stark still. images

Historically, freeze frames and framed friezes relate. The Roman Catholic “stations of the cross,” are essentially a 14 panel storyboard of the passion of Jesus Christ and present everything a mostly illiterate medieval congregation would have required to understand the narrative. Director Chris Marker took this concept to its filmic extreme with La Jetée, (1962). Its 28 minute runtime is composed almost entirely of black and white still images. The outcome has the feel of reading a fumetti, the pulpy “photo novellas” popular in Europe during the 1950s and 60s.

In fact, movie storyboards so closely resemble comic strips that it is no surprise that early animator Windsor McCay was also a preeminent cartoonist of his time. His Dreams of a Rarebit Fiend and Little Nemo in Slumberland are still revered as blueprints for outsider work on the printed page. As his characters’ exploits often broke through the walls of their outlined panels, McCay also broke the “fourth wall” of the cinema screen when he toured his animated featurette Gertie the Dinosaur (1919). During the showing McCay would engage the projected cartoon creature to do his bidding, much like a trained circus elephant.

The Frame Game…
So what have I learned from the movies? Although I did not continue to pursue three dimensional animation, even as an avocation, I did take away an appreciation for the peak moment of action.

As a photojournalist I’ve aspired to catch those key moments that make images memorable. It’s not just about freezing the height of action. On candid shoots, I’ve learned to watch for the “a-ha” or eureka moments in people’s faces, the body language that reveals their personalities, and the eye contact between subjects that conveys to the viewer something special has just transpired.

Solely as a personal challenge, I often try to capture that instant by attempting to “read” the subject without resorting to rapid frame mode. It’s very hard not to succumb to the temptation of over shooting that digital photography allows. I try to honor the methods of my film days when I had to reduce an entire story to a maximum of 72 exposures. On a current photo shoot, with a DSLR and unlimited digital film resources, it appears to be anathema.

I know it’s old school, but I’m an old guy now. Utilizing the skills I’ve polished over 50 years is not just a comfort zone but offers a real sense of satisfaction. Recently I’ve been using the camera in my iPhone and Instagram, it seems the perfect platform to keep refining single image as story skills. It may even lead to doing some simple animation again.

"Sea-Saw" Some current personal work that seems ripe for animation. Art Copyright: Peter Parrella 2016

Motion in the ocean? “Sea-Saw” Some current personal work that seems ripe for animation. Art Copyright: Peter Parrella 2016


eMotion…
Soon even the best sports and event photographers will begin to supplant their still imaging methods with 4K and 5K video captures that facilitate grabbing that peak moment from the overall action effortlessly. Does it feel like a cheat? Sure, but maybe the wheel felt like a cheat to the guy who was used to pushing a square boulder up the hill. I’m no luddite, and I look forward to working with these new technologies with the knowledge that a great image will continue to evoke authentic response no matter its creative vehicle.

SkeletonPete Says…
I had a wonderful time putting this piece but finding the flow to complete it wasn’t easy. Writing about visual communication leaves much in the synapses that (for me at least) cannot be expressed accurately with words. The thought belatedly crossed my mind to present the post as a storyboard, but deadlines (and meager skills) precluded that.

Finding Dr. Temple Grandin’s Thinking In Pictures during my research was a revelation, and an affirmation of my own previsualization techniques. I highly recommend you take a look as well.

No Bikini Atoll: My Beach Party Blogathon 2015 Post

Ghostinvisiblebikini

(Editor’s Note: Oowee, got in just under the wire with this one. Thanks to Ruth of Silver Screenings and Kristina of Speakeasy for a neat excuse to write about one of my all-time guiltiest pleasures.)

Oh man, it’s literally the eleventh hour for posting a review Speakeasy/Silver Screenings’ 2015 Beach Party Blogathon, so here goes…

The Ghostess with the Mostest…
Released in April of 1966, on the tail end of American International Pictures’ (AIP) beach party film chronology, The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (GitIB) stands as my favorite in the series.

What makes GitIB so much fun is its kitchen sink nature. It feels like there was a tacit acknowledgement that the “endless summer” of the surfin’ 60’s might actually be waning after all and a pull out all the stops attempt to buoy this baby was required. It shares a “more is better” affinity with the latter Universal Pictures monster rallies of House of Frankenstein and House of Dracula.

beach party films, beach party blogathon, ghost in the invisible bikini

Cecily (Susan Hart) hips her “Hiram Baby” (Boris Karloff) to his new existence.

Too Much Monkey Business…
Couched in the – even then – hackneyed trappings of the “Old Dark House,” The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini could pass for a live Scooby Doo episode. It also greatly resembles the previous generation’s Kay Kyser vehicle You’ll Find Out, (1940) even sharing Boris Karloff as a cast member. The one twist in the script is that the villains have no idea they are being thwarted by real ghosts. Those ghosts are portrayed by Susan Hart, as Cecily, the titular see-thru character, and Karloff as former carnival owner Hiram Stokely, her surprised to find himself deceased beau.
beach party films, beach party blogathon, ghost in the invisible bikini

Gorilla My Dreams: Mighty Monstro in classic carrying the heroine mode.

Poe Knows…
The rest of the large GitIB cast is run through a series of the oldest story and sight gags in theatrical history. There’s an inheritance at stake, a multitude of revolving walls, secret passages and falling chandeliers, portraits that watch you, an escaped carnival gorilla, damsel in distress on a buzz saw, a grand guignol waxworks, and a string of Mack Sennet style chases. Fans of Roger Corman‘s Edgar Allan Poe films can have a heyday perusing this movie’s mis en scene. To my eye Stokley’s chamber of horrors was also the set of many an AIP EAP romp. Can anyone help out with specifics here?

Original series leads Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello are replaced by another post-Disney kid, Tommy Kirk, and Deborah Walley in the hero and heroine roles. Beach film stalwart Harvey Lembeck, does mega slapstick throughout, returning for his last ride as motorcycle gang leader Eric Von Zipper.

Other cast members are a convergence of old and new Hollywood of the mid-1960’s. It’s an aspect the film shares with the contemporaneous Batman TV series, which premiered on ABC TV a few months earlier. Karloff, Basil Rathbone, Patsy Kelly, Jesse Young, and even Francis X. Bushman appear alongside the bevy of beach kids, with Rat Pack scion Nancy Sinatra and Claudia Martin representing a changing of the guard.

beach party films, beach party blogathon, ghost in the invisible bikini

Nancy Sinatra sings “Geronimo” backed by the Bobby Fuller Four.

Teardrop City…
Sinatra offers a catchy pop tune “Geronimo,” backed by The Bobby Fuller Four. Fuller can be seen gyrating wildly through the instrumental “Swing A-Ma Thing” wielding an awesome Vox white teardrop guitar. The group serves as “house band” throughout the film. All songs are credited to series regulars Guy Hemric and Jerry Styner. The Les Baxter soundtrack is augmented by drip-drop reverb laden sound effects.
beach party films, beach party blogathon, ghost in the invisible bikini

Susan Hart, as the transparent title character, boogies through the end credits with the AIP teen troupe

SkeletonPete Says…
Historically Ghost in the Invisible Bikini represents a last innocent romp prior to the LSD exploitation and sensationalism of films like Riot On Sunset Strip, Pysch-Out and The Trip. Those films in turn presaged studio system killers like Five Easy Pieces and Easy Rider. Think of the cultural gap between The Monkees’ September 1966 pilot episode and their cinematic swansong Head and you’ll get my point.

I love the film because it incapsulates my late pre-teens with remembrances of the aforementioned Batman and Monkees TV series, The Munsters, Aurora plastic model monster kits, Famous Monsters of Filmland and Monster World magazines, Top 40 from a transistor radio speaker, The Beach Boys’ “Good Vibrations” on the AM airwaves, and begging my pop to take me to see Karloff in AIP’s Lovecraft adaptation Die Monster, Die.

Kid Dino-Mite: 1964 NY World’s Fair Memories

A 9 Year Old SkeletonPete, Risks Being Nipped by a Steg.

A 9 Year Old SkeletonPete, Risks Being Nipped by a Steg.

This spring marks the 50th Anniversary of the opening of The 1964/65 New York World’s Fair. The convoluted political history of the Fair is well documented elsewhere on the internet, and is being celebrated on its former site at Flushing Meadow Park, in one of the few buildings left.

Though the fair introduced many innovations like the Disney effects department’s “animatronics” figures, I’ll keep this post focused on a couple of personal recollections and images specifically about Sinclair Oil Corporation’s Dinoland. Sinclair touted their fossil fuel product with a nice green dinosaur logo and Dinoland was a pre-Jurrasic Park petting zoo of sorts presenting life size fiberglass replicas of prehistoric fauna.

Missed the Boat…
Part of my story includes a dinosaur sized disappointment. In the middle of October 1963 those titanic saurians were being barged down the Hudson river from their creation point at Luis Paul Jonas’s studio in upstate New York to the fair site in Queens. Their trip included several scheduled stops, one at Manhattan’s Battery. It was a spectacular way to ballyhoo the upcoming fair.

Appreciating my love of prehistoric creatures, my folks decided a day out of school for a unique field trip was in order. We hopped on a subway and unfortunately arrived minutes after the barge had completed it’s docking and continued on the way to the Fair grounds. I recall that our only family photos show the barge way out on the river, its outsized cargo too far in the distance to appreciate the scope of.

My 1964 Dinoland "Mold-A-Rama Machine" Steg.

My 1964 Dinoland “Mold-A-Rama Machine” Steg.


Fortunately this sad story came to a happy ending the following year, and as you can see from these photos I got some up close and personal time with the critters. I also brought home a “Mold-A-Rama” replica of the stegosaurus, though at the time I was dismayed to find the T-Rex mold machine (my first preference) was out of order. Mold-A-Rama machines have a neat history of their own, and can still be found at many fair sites pumping out their freshly minted “hot potato” mementos.
The Purlioned Ornitholestes is Front and Center.

The Purlioned Ornitholestes is Front and Center.


Lost World…
Over the years Dinoland’s inhabitants have been tracked down to their current residences across the United States with, I believe, the exception being the small pictured in the foreground of the image above.

My Dad had put a camera in my hands pretty early on, so even by 9-10 years old I could make a reasonable aperture adjustment and frame a shot the way I wanted it. I know for sure that the framing of the photo above was going for a “time travel” effect, with the dinosaurs in the foreground and space age rockets visible in the rear.

An "Animal World" like Tableau featured Brontosaurus Hatchlings Being Menaced.

An “Animal World” like Tableau featured Brontosaurus Hatchlings Being Menaced.


One photo of mine reveals the little discussed tableau of just hatched baby Apatosaurs (Brontosaurs in my day) being menaced by an errant archaeopteryx. This scene always reminded me of a similar hatching in Irwin Allen’s The Animal World. At 9 years old that image that was already burned into my brain via the Sawyer View-Master “Prehistoric Animals” slide set, though I had yet to see the film.

SkeletonPete Says…
Dinoland can easily be seen as the progenitor of today’s “Walking With Dinosaurs” shows, which add motility to the mix. The Australian staging of “King Kong,” in the process of finding a home in New York City, is sure to please the next generation of dinosaur kids.

SkeletonPete’s Yester-Play #1: Star-Spangled Warriors

A SkeletonPete "Yester-Play" Tribute to the War That Time Forgot Series.

A SkeletonPete “Yester-Play” Tribute to the War That Time Forgot Series.

Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yester-Play…
Here’s a photographic homage to those thrilling days of “yester-play.” It’s first in a series I hope to continue as the muses allow. The idea is to periodically root through my old basement toy barrel for inspiration and attempt to artistically photograph whatever I pull out. The first “excavation” yielded this fanciful two-headed Tyrannosaurus and triggered a remembrance of one of my favorite comic book series, Star Spangled War Stories.

What It Is…
Some of my earliest comic book encounters came when my parents or grandparents would walk me to the corner candy store to peruse the newsstand and there before my wondering eyes would be a new issue of DC Comics’ Star Spangled War Stories. Why was Star Spangled so special? Well, because in May of 1960 (with Issue #90) DC began an incredible run of stories that mashed up World War II tales with a land-that-time-forgot motif. In other words, G.I.’s versus dinosaurs stories. Usually heralded by spectacular Joe Kubert or Ross Andru/Mike Esposito rendered covers, they launched me into innumerable hours of pitting my John’s Bargain Store green plastic soldiers against an onslaught from my Louis Marx dinosaur collection.

So here for your approval is my imagining of a Star Spangled tale never told. As with my Safari Ltd. “Good Luck Mini’s” tribute to King Kong, this shot was staged as a table-top tableau using bath towels, house plants and garden rocks for the scenery. The really neat metal tank was a serendipitous discovery in the local 99 Cent store, as was the G.I. in the foreground.

This Cover for Star Spangled War Stories #125 Typifies the Dinosaur Island Series.

This Cover for Star Spangled War Stories #125 Typifies the Dinosaur Island Series.


For more information on the original books, here is the Wiki.

All the great covers can be found in DC Comics’ Archive. The “War That Time Forgot” and “Dinosaur Island” stories began with Issue 90 and ended with Issue 137 (March 1968,) after which the book became a vehicle for the Enemy Ace character.
Star-Spangled_War_Stories_124
Incoming…
DC Comics recently announced plans to revive the Star Spangled War Stories title with issue #1 arriving in July 2014. Focus will be on a G.I. Zombie character, but I can’t imagine that the temptation to revisit the land of tanks vs. dinosaurs can be resisted.